4 Ways to Teach Your Kids to Love Their Natural Hair

BY: - 22 Aug '13 | Natural Hair

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There’s a saying that goes, “If you’re not into your hair, you’re not into yourself.” If you really think about this for a moment, it’s not too far from the truth. Bad hair days tend to make for plain ol’ bad days overall. When your hair looks great, you feel amazing, and your day tends to go even better.

Believe it or not, a lot of self-esteem lies within the strands of our hair. While I’m not a child expert, I do have a little boy of my own; and I know for a fact that high self-esteem starts from childhood. I also know that it’s incredibly important for children to have healthy levels of confidence, which will serve them well as they develop and grow into prospering adults.

In the span of my career, I have seen how many children believe they have “bad” hair, where others, according to them have “good” hair. The bottom line is all hair is good; there is no “bad” hair. But I’ve seen well-meaning adults use phrases like “so-and-so has a good grade of hair”, which kids easily pick up on. If the child doesn’t have a texture similar to that quote-unquote “good grade of hair”, they immediately think their hair is bad. And as we’ve already been discussing, “bad” hair really strikes a nerve when it comes to self-esteem.

Here are a few ways you can ensure your children grow into tweens, teens and adults who love themselves…and their hair:

Curb hair texture comparisons

Even when you’re talking with friends, your kids are listening. If you find yourself having conversations similar to the aforementioned one, put it to an end. You have more long-lasting influence than you may realize. Instead, praise your child and constantly tell him or her they are beautiful/handsome; and that their hair is amazing just like they are.

Put those magazine subscriptions to good use.

It’s pretty easy these days to find awesome images of any hair texture. Just flip through your favorite magazines or browse the ‘net and you’re sure to come up with a multitude of gorgeousness. It’s important for your child to see such images and realize that his or her hair type is absolutely stunning.  Combining this with your own high confidence levels will help to ensure your child exudes a healthy self confidence that will last a lifetime.

Try to find dolls that possess your child’s hair texture

Particularly for little girls, dolls are some of their first friends. Kids tend to associate beauty with their doll friends, and if she doesn’t see herself in her dolls, she may grow to believe that she is not as beautiful as they are. Hair texture is very similar. When I was a kid, you’d be hard pressed to find any dolls that looked like me with my hair type. But nowadays, the options have greatly increased. There are dolls of every ethnicity and every hair texture. Make sure your child sees a similar beauty between her dolls’ hair and her own. This will help translate into healthy levels of self-confidence as she grows up.

Check out the post “HOW TO: Make Your Child’s Dolls Have “Natural” Hair

Lead by Example

You are one of the biggest influences on your child. If you’re constantly talking about how much you hate your hair, or how much better someone else’s hair is than yours, your child will absorb and internalize all that negativity. Start by learning to love your own hair. Find cool ways to wear it so that you feel great about yourself. Speak positively about your hair and your overall beauty; your child will surely emulate you.

Check out the post  ”10 Tips to Help You Start Managing Your Child’s Natural Hair

BMWK – Have you ever unknowingly said negative comments about your child’s hair or your own hair? What things do you do to ensure your children love themselves and their hair?  

A longtime and highly sought after healthy hair care expert, Gwen Jimmere is the founder and CEO of NATURALICIOUS, the #1 Detroit-based natural hair company and the first to develop a natural hair care system that specifically meets the many needs of curly hair textures. After years of breakage, extreme dryness and overall bad hair, she decided it was high time to put all that hands-on training to good use and really begin loving her hair as is – curly, thick and luscious – and she hasn’t looked back since. Through her love of teaching others to do the same, she provides optimistic and rational education on everything healthy hair care.

About the author

BMWK Staff

http://www.blackandmarriedwithkids.com

Content and articles from the staff and guest contributors of BlackandMarriedWithKids.com

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3 WordPress comments on “4 Ways to Teach Your Kids to Love Their Natural Hair

  1. Tawanna Parnell

    As a natural Haircare products professional, I can really appreciate this article for showing how important hair and Haircare is in our community and in our families. The very first relationship we (and our children) will ever have is with ourselves. We must learn to love our whole self before we can truly love someone else. And that translates to our children as well.

    For information on HOW to take care of your or your child’s hair as well as a variety of great product choices, check out http://www.allthingscurly.com. Be blessed!

    Reply
  2. Kpana Kpoto

    This post is speaking to me. I am a huge advocate of natural hair for our young black girls. It is amazing how as adults we do not realize how our attitude toward our hair can affect our children and girls around us. It will take generations to eradicate our feelings about “good hair” but this post is a good start. Thank you.

    Reply
  3. ysabella20

    I HATE the term “good hair” with a passion. If your hair grows from your scalp, it’s good. It is wonderful that so many people have seen the light and the natural hair movement is stronger than ever.

    Reply

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