Parents Worry, But Aren’t Aiding in Child’s Online Privacy

BY: - 21 Nov '12 | On the Web

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Many parents remain concerned about the safety of their children while using social media sites, so why aren’t more of them helping to set up privacy settings?

A recent report from the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project showed that while 72 percent of the 802 surveyed parents felt concern about their children interacting with strangers online and 70 percent feared their children’s online habits could affect their future, only 39 percent of teen’s parents helped them set up their privacy settings.

Even further into the study, it was found that age, race and class helped determine the use of privacy settings. Half of younger teens had help from parents, white parents are twice as likely to set up privacy settings compared to black parents and high-income families are more likely to set them up.

These differences remain despite the fact that 82 percent of parents under 40 have social media accounts. Read the entire article on TIME’s website.

BMWK — How are you actively involved in your child’s use of social media? Do these findings surprise you

About the author

Stacie Bailey wrote 160 articles on this blog.

Stacie Bailey is a graduate of Quinnipiac University with a master's degree in Interactive Communications. She has strong interests in youth, social media and an overall love for sharing knowledge and information.

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Married Parents Face Poverty, Too

BY: - 21 Nov '12 | Money

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Conversations involving poverty often revolve around single parenthood, unmarried mothers and the like. However recent data has shown that the poverty rate for married couples is going up–an increase of 47 percent since 2000.

While single parents have always seen more financial burdens, the fall of wages and rise of unemployment combined with lack of paid leave and affordable childcare has caused married couples who don’t even have kids to see a 22 percent rise in poverty rates. Married couples who do have kids, are “even more recession-sensitive,” because they have more expenses and less flexibility according to CEPR report author, Shawn Fremstad.

“Poverty and economic insecurity are about a lot more than having children out of wedlock,” says Fremstad, who notes that many of the people now viewed as “single” in poverty statistics actually live with a partner. “There are a lot of people who, if they said ‘I do,’ would still be in the same boat.” Fremstad also says that the data show disability is also a significant problem, affecting roughly 10 percent of poor married families.”

The objective is not to create a situation of seeing who’s worst off, but to build a better understanding of poverty so we can get rid of it. Public policy professor at Harvard, Kathryn Edin, explains reasons why poor women put motherhood before marriage in her book, Promises I Can Keep.The solution to poverty is not getting married, it’s more about getting good jobs, decent wages and flexibility.

Read more on the Atlantic website.

BMWK– What do you see as possible causes of poverty? Do you see any way to combat it?

About the author

Stacie Bailey wrote 160 articles on this blog.

Stacie Bailey is a graduate of Quinnipiac University with a master's degree in Interactive Communications. She has strong interests in youth, social media and an overall love for sharing knowledge and information.

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