Mama Bear Alert: How One Mom Responds When She’s Told Her Daughter Has “Bad Hair”

BY: - 19 Feb '16 | Parenting

Share this article!

TNMWomanThumbsDownNo_feature

I had a close family member make a joke about one of my daughter’s “nappy” hair. She thought I was going to be amused.  The conversation quickly changed when I gave her to look of death and told her that under NO circumstances was she to ever say those words in front of my daughter. EVER.

I WAS NOT AMUSED.

I have three beautiful daughters, all with different hair textures.  One with straight hair, she has no curl pattern and is always complaining about that.  One with the thickest strongest curliest head of hair and she doesn’t like it either.  Another with a head full of long wavy curls and she could care less about hair.  And I’m guilty too…just yesterday I told my husband that I am sick….SICK of my natural hair and I wanted cut it all off.

I hope I didn’t say that in front of them.

But as their mother, I am constantly telling each of them how beautiful they are…inside and out.  So how dare you, black woman that is related to us, come along and try to undermine what I am doing to teach them to love themselves and their natural hair with your careless words.

You don’t think it matters? Well it does.  I can still remember one of my uncles, yes my father’s brother, telling me that boys like long hair after making a comment about my short hair.  I was young, not even in my teens and I can remember that statement like it was yesterday. And he has probably hasn’t given those words a second thought…ever.

This is why I am so happy to discover the book Bad Hair Does Not Exist/Pelo Malo No Existe!, written by a mother after the babysister said her daughter had “bad hair.”

Bad Hair Does Not Exist

NBCBLK reports:

“”Bad Hair Does Not Exist!” is a new bilingual book that encourages young Black, Afro-Latino, and multi-racial girls to see themselves, and their hair, as beautiful.

Sulma Arzu-Brown, who calls herself a “Garifuna” woman or Afro-Latino from Honduras, was inspired to write the book after her three-year-old daughter’s babysitter commented that little Bella Victoria had “pelo malo,” which is a Spanish term for “bad hair.”

She knew then that she could either be angry or be a part of the solution, so she chose to write a book.’

Please go over to NBCBLK to learn more about Sulma ARzu-Brown, the book Bad Hair Does Not Exist!, and what makes her so frustrated….

BMWK: Have you ever had anyone say you or your kids had bad hair? Do you find yourself having to be careful of how you talk about your own hair around your children?

About the author

Ronnie Tyler wrote 508 articles on this blog.

Ronnie Tyler is the co-creator of BlackandMarriedWithKids.com and co-producer of the films Happily Ever After: A Positive Image of Black Marriage, You Saved Me, Men Ain't Boys and Still Standing. The proud mom of 4 has been selected by Parenting Magazine as a Must-Read Mom and is one of Babble's Top 100 Mom Bloggers.

Store

like what you're reading?

Start Shopping!

Discussion

Facebook Wordpress

One thought on “Mama Bear Alert: How One Mom Responds When She’s Told Her Daughter Has “Bad Hair”

  1. Pingback: Mama Bear Alert: How One Mom Responds When She’s Told Her Daughter Has “Bad Hair” | Cafémocharadio.com

Leave a Reply

Get
Parenting Articles Delivered To Your Inbox Daily! Sign up below!

Is it ever too early to protect your children from sexually transmitted disease?

BY: - 22 Feb '16 | Headline

Share this article!

TNMThreeTeenGirlsFeature

According to new government research released today, the prevalence of the human papillomavirus (HPV) has decreased by nearly two-thirds since the introduction of the HPV vaccine in the United States. Some suggest the news may help to bolster the currently low immunization numbers, which according to the New York Times lie around 40 percent of girls and 20 percent of boys for ages 13 though 17.

The vaccine is intended to prevent certain strains of the virus and thus cancers (such as cervical and anal) caused by HPV, which is the most common sexual transmitted disease. In fact, the CDC estimates that more than 80 of sexually active males and females will contract some form of the virus in his or her lifetime. Because of the high occurrence, the risks associated with HPV and the more favorable vaccine immune responses in younger children, the CDC recommends vaccinating before the start of sexual activity, at age 11 or 12.

Yet, reluctance to the shot may likely be due to the uneasiness of vaccinating for a sexually transmitted disease at such young ages. So far, only two states and the District of Columbia, place the vaccine on the mandatory immunization schedule for school enrollment. In the 10 years since its U.S. introduction, the vaccine is still fully optional in the rest of the country, which gives those parents and doctors the option to exercise a choice on the matter. Critics of CDC’s age recommendation argue that early immunization may encourage sexual activity while advocates counter that there is no age too young if it has the potential to save lives.

So BMWK parents, we are curious, where do you stand? Is age just a number and nonfactor when it comes to your child’s long-term health? Or do you still feel a little disquieted about the age range and prefer to delay the decision to immunize when your child is older?

About the author

Nina Hemphill Reeder wrote 71 articles on this blog.

Nina Reeder is the assistant editor at BMWK. Reeder is a professional journalist, who has contributed for publications and outlets, such as Ebony magazine, AOL.com, Marriott Hotels and more. She has also worked as the senior editor at Upscale magazine, a national lifestyle/entertainment magazine.

Store

like what you're reading?

Start Shopping!

Discussion

Facebook Wordpress